zeldathemes
"Enthusiasm is everything."
My name is Zada. Who are you?
Warning! This blog may contain: Cats, feminism, funny text posts, reddit, more cats, personal whinging, a lot of art and more feminism. I don't bite unless it's previously discussed and mutually consentual. <3

dylanthescientist:

princetanaka:

just a small town girl. Living in a racist, insensitive, sexist, homophobic world,

(cant take the midnight train ‘cause im fuckin scared)

  #feminism    #ha  

theodd1sout:

This will help you write good.

  #mastergrey    #comics  

When I was seventeen and preparing to leave for university, my mother’s only brother saw fit to give me some advice.
“Just don’t be an idiot, kid,” he told me, “and don’t ever forget that boys and girls can never just be friends.”
I laughed and answered, “I’m not too worried. And I don’t really think all guys are like that.”

When I was eighteen and the third annual advent of the common cold was rolling through residence like a pestilent fog, a friend texted me asking if there was anything he could do to help.
I told him that if he could bring me up some vitamin water that would be great, if it wasn’t too much trouble.
That semester I learned that human skin cells replace themselves every three to five weeks. I hoped that in a month, maybe I’d stop feeling the echoes of his touch; maybe my new skin would feel cleaner.
It didn’t. But I stood by what I said. Not all guys are like that.

When I was nineteen and my roommate decided the only way to celebrate the end of midterms was to get wasted at a club, I humoured her.
Four drinks, countless leers and five hands up my skirt later, I informed her I was ready to leave.
“I get why you’re upset,” she told me on the walk home, “but you have to tolerate that sort of thing if you want to have any fun. And really, not all guys are like that.”

(Age nineteen also saw me propositioned for casual sex by no fewer than three different male friends, and while I still believe that guys and girls can indeed be just friends, I was beginning to see my uncle’s point.)

When I was twenty and a stranger that started chatting to me in my usual cafe asked if he could walk with me (since we were going the same way and all), I accepted.
Before we’d even made it three blocks he was pulling me into an alleyway and trying to put his hands up my shirt. “You were staring,” he laughed when I asked what the fuck he was doing (I wasn’t), “I’m just taking pity.”
But not all guys are like that.

I am twenty one and a few days ago a friend and I were walking down the street. A car drove by with the windows down, and a young man stuck his head out and whistled as they passed. I ignored it, carrying on with the conversation.
My friend did not. “Did you know those people?” He asked.
“Not at all,” I answered.
Later when we sat down to eat he got this thoughtful look on his face. When I asked what was wrong he said, “You know not all guys do that kind of thing, right? We’re not all like that.”
As if he were imparting some great profound truth I’d never realized before. My entire life has been turned around, because now I’ve been enlightened: not all guys are like that.

No. Not all guys are. But enough are. Enough that I am uncomfortable when a man sits next to me on the bus. Enough that I will cross to the other side of the street if I see a pack of guys coming my way. Enough that even fleeting eye contact with a male stranger makes my insides crawl with unease. Enough that I cannot feel safe alone in a room with some of my male friends, even ones I’ve known for years. Enough that when I go out past dark for chips or milk or toilet paper, I carry a knife, I wear a coat that obscures my figure, I mimic a man’s gait. Enough that three years later I keep the story of that day to myself, when the only thing that saved me from being raped was a right hook to the jaw and a threat to scream in a crowded dorm, because I know what the response will be.

I live my life with the everburning anxiety that someone is going to put their hands on me regardless of my feelings on the matter, and I’m not going to be able to stop them. I live with the knowledge that statistically one in three women have experienced a sexual assault, but even a number like that can’t be trusted when we are harassed into silence. I live with the learned instinct, the ingrained compulsion to keep my mouth shut to jeers and catcalls, to swallow my anger at lewd suggestions and crude gestures, to put up my walls against insults and threats. I live in an environment that necessitates armouring myself against it just to get through a day peacefully, and I now view that as normal. I have adapted to extreme circumstances and am told to treat it as baseline. I carry this fear close to my heart, rooted into my bones, and I do so to keep myself unharmed.

So you can tell me that not all guys are like that, and you’d even be right, but that isn’t the issue anymore. My problem is not that I’m unaware of the fact that some guys are perfectly civil, decent, kind—my problem is simply this:

In a world where this cynical overcaution is the only thing that ensures my safety, I’m no longer willing to take the risk.

r.d. (via vonmoire)
  #feminism    #rape culture    #trigger warning    #this says a lot of things better than i often try to  

smitethepatriarchy:

clara-mag:

facebooksexism:

sweet-sour-bipolar:

not-so-breaking news: when someone calls themselves your boy toy (go urban dictionary the meaning) when the most you’ve ever done is hug them, violate other countless boundaries, and won’t stop messaging you on Facebook they apparently hold “the deepest respect for you” and aren’t creeps!

Remember the whole, “No” is a complete sentence thing? Well, so is “go fuck yourself” too, actually. That is a pretty firm “leave me alone” boundary that this guy calls vague and continues to message Lis. Gross.

and the only indication you gave me to stop texting you was “go fuck yourself”.

HAHAHA HAHAHAHAHA OH SO VAGUE AHAHAHAHA

HAHA

HA

HA

HA

HA

HA

HA

HA

HA*bricktoyourface*HA

^

  #feminism    #creeper  

the-challenge-is-accepted:

geekygothgirl:

unatheblade:

biscuitsarenice:

We Can’t Get Out Of The Bedroom Now.

Shirley Maclaine on Parkinson in 1975

Mind. Blown.

…I never thought I would say this but damn, I think I’m in love with Shirley Maclaine. Just. Wow. NAILED IT. What’s sad is this was thirty years ago but it could have been filmed thirty seconds ago for how relevant it is.

  #feminism  
  #feminism  

applejackismyhomegirl:

shoesxships:

girldork:

being a feminist is like trying to fix a giant hole in the wall and discovering that the entire wall is rotting and filled with termites and you have a lot more work to do than you thought you did

And also the termites verbally attack you while you fix the wall.

"NOT ALL TERMITES ARE LIKE THAT"

  #feminism    #lol  
deviantart:

Holy gams, Batman!
I may live to regret drawing this by Stephenbyrne

deviantart:

Holy gams, Batman!

I may live to regret drawing this by Stephenbyrne

  #feminism    #art    #batman  

lesbianships:

sonianeverland:

barbiefett:

azurite-crystals:

So lemme get this straight

Robin Thicke

image

this is ok and sexy and fun haha

Justin Timberlake

image

This is ok and artsy and oh wow how modern

Miley Cyrus

image

THIS IS OBSCENE WHAT A SLUT I CANNOT BELIEVE THIS IS WHAT SHES DOING THIS IS MADDNESS HOW DARE SHE WHAT A SLUT WHAT DOES HER FATHER THINK I AM GOING TO FAINT

Is this correct?

reblogging a gain

Because naked women have to be under a man’s control or else they’re dangerous and scary

image

  #feminism  

smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularlyhow do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

  #feminism